Deep learning has been widely applied and brought breakthroughs in speech recognition, computer vision, and many other domains. The involved deep neural network architectures and computational issues have been well studied in machine learning. But there lacks a theoretical foundation for understanding the modelling, approximation or generalization ability of deep learning models with network architectures. Here we are interested in deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) with convolutional structures. The convolutional architecture gives essential differences between the deep CNNs and fully-connected deep neural networks, and the classical theory for fully-connected networks developed around 30 years ago does not apply. This talk describes a mathematical theory of deep CNNs associated with the rectified linear unit (ReLU) activation function.



 



In particular, we give the first proof for the universality of deep CNNs, meaning that a deep CNN can be used to approximate any continuous function to an arbitrary accuracy when the depth of the neural network is large enough. We also give explicit rates of approximation, and show that the approximation ability of deep CNNs is at least as good as that of fully-connected multi-layer neural networks for general functions, and is better for radial functions. Our quantitative estimate, given tightly in terms of the number of free parameters to be computed, verifies the efficiency of deep CNNs in dealing with big data.

18
November 2020
3pm - 4:20pm
Where
https://hkust.zoom.us/j/98248767613 (Passcode: math6380p)
Organizer(S)
Department of Mathematics
Contact/Enquiries
Payment Details
Audience
Alumni, Faculty and staff, PG students, UG students
Language
English
Other Events
Seminar, Lecture, Talk
MATH - Seminar on Applied Mathematics - Thirty Years of Applied Mathematics
The 50's to the 80's saw tremendous growth of applied math, driven mainly by PDEs and numerical algorithms. The integration of the two produced the "Courant School", which has had a far-reaching impac...
11
Nov 2020
Seminar, Lecture, Talk
PHYS Seminar - Learning Physics at Future e-e+ Colliders with Machine
10
Nov 2020