Research and Innovation |
HKUST Scientists Rebuild Synapse-like Machineries to Unveil its Formation and Regulatory Mechanism Paving Ways for Diagnosis and Early Intervention of Mental Disorders

A research team led by Prof Mingjie Zhang, Kerry Holdings Professor of Science in the Division of Life Scienceat The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), has employed a novel biochemical reconstitution approach to show how proteins in postsynaptic density (PSD) are regulated in synapses to process and transmit brain signals, which may provide insights into further research on early detection and intervention of mental disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

Synapses, the structure that allows neurons to pass signals to one another, are essential to neuronal function. Proper formation and responses to stimulation of synapses are fundamental to brain functions, but to understand what governs the formation and regulation of compartmentalized synaptic assemblies is difficult as the number of synapses in an entire brain is enormous and it is hard to find two identical synapses – there is no simple repeating structural unit within synapses.

In their recent study, the HKUST research team rebuilt – in solution and on membrane bilayers –  a PSD-like structure and demonstrated the dynamic interactions between PSD proteins upon stimulation. The reconstituted PSD condensates also recaptured several key functional features of PSD in living neurons, which indicates that the highly condensed PSD assemblies in living neurons might autonomously form, stably exist, and dynamically change.

“Our biochemical reconstitution approach built a molecular platform that provides a likely answer to the mechanism of synapse-based cellular compartmentalization of neurons – a striking morphology that is critical for the functions of neurons,” said Dr Menglong Zeng, a post-doctoral researcher on Prof Zhang’s team and a co-author of the paper.

“The information derived from such a reconstitution system, together with experiments performed in living neurons, offer valuable insights into understanding the roles of the PSD proteins in synaptic formation and functions,” said Prof Zhang. “Although still vastly simplified, this well-defined biochemically traceable system provides a platform and a new paradigm for studying excitatory PSD formation and regulation as well as for elucidating mechanisms of a range of brain disorders caused by mutations of synaptic encoding genes in the future, which could ultimately help early detection and intervention of mental disorders.”

The findings were published in the top scientific journal Cell on Aug 2, 2018, which is the latest of a series of findings (e.g. a related paper published in Cell on Aug 25, 2016) from Prof Zhang’s lab on this fundamental topic of brain science.  The laboratory of Prof Penger Tong, Head of Department of Physics at HKUST, contributed to this study by ascertaining the material properties of the PSD assembly in the condensed phase.

About The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) (www.ust.hk) is a world-class research university that focuses on science, technology and business as well as humanities and social science.  HKUST offers an international campus, and a holistic and interdisciplinary pedagogy to nurture well-rounded graduates with global vision, a strong entrepreneurial spirit and innovative thinking.  HKUST attained the highest proportion of internationally excellent research work in the Research Assessment Exercise 2014 of Hong Kong’s University Grants Committee, and is ranked as the world’s best young university in Times Higher Education’s Young University Rankings 2018.  Its graduates were ranked 12th worldwide and top in Greater China in Global Employability University Survey 2017.

For media enquiries, please contact:

Anita Lam
Tel : 2358 6313
Email: anitalam@ust.hk

Johnny Tam
Tel : 2358 8556
Email : johnnytam@ust.hk

Research and Innovation |
HKUST Scientists Determine Atomic Structure of DNA Replication Machine to Make Groundbreaking Discovery of DNA Replication Mechanism

Cells propagate by making copies of themselves through replicating their DNA genome, which are blueprints of their identities.  Every full grown human came from a single fertilized egg cell whose genome is replicated approximately 10 million-billion times.  What does the molecular machine that carries out this Herculean task look like?  A research team led by scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have determined the three dimensional structure of the DNA replication machinery at atomic resolution for the first time in history.

When DNA replication was first proposed based on its double helix structure over half a century ago, many believed that deciphering the machine that separates the two strands of DNA for replication is near to come.  However, it turns out to be a much complicated task due to the large size, multi-partite nature (made up of three engines) and its flexibility of the machine.

Today, capitalizing on the Cryo-electron microscopy (CryoEM) technology, a team led by Prof Bik Tye, Senior Visiting Member of HKUST Jockey Club Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) (retired Visiting Professor of Life Science (LIFS)) at HKUST and Prof Yuanliang Zhai, former Research Assistant Professor (RAP) at HKUST who is now an Assistant Professor at the University of Hong Kong, in collaboration with Prof Ning Gao, Professor of Life Sciences at Peking University – have managed to decipher the function of eukaryotes’ DNA replication machine, Origin Recognition Complex (ORC), at unprecedented resolution.  This structure explains how ORC is able to scan a sea of bases (DNA is made up of 4 bases, A, T, G, C) to select the correct sites programmed for DNA replication to begin.

It is believed that indiscriminate selection of too many sites may lead to rapid replication of the genome and therefore rapid cell divisions – a characteristic of cancer cells.  In contrast, inefficient selection of sites resulting in sluggish cell divisions especially at critical junctures of human development, such as embryogenesis, may lead to developmental disorders.  A three dimensional view of the DNA replication machine at 3Å resolution may help to identify better targets for cancer therapy such that synthetic chemicals can be custom made to fit the target.  More importantly, structures help to fully understand the mechanistic functions of molecular machines and therefore the roots of diseases due to suboptimal functions of these machines.

These findings on ORC were published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature on 4 July 2018 - the latest of a series of articles published by the Tye (HKUST)/Gao (PKU) collaboration that has opened the door for deciphering the function of the DNA replication machine at unprecedented resolutions.  The first, published in Nature 2015, determined the structure of the core engine of the DNA replication machine called the MCM complex.  The second reported an open-ringed structure of the Cdt1–Mcm2–7 complex as a precursor of the MCM double hexamer, which was published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology.

Prof Tye’s interest in the mechanisms for DNA replication dated from when she established her own laboratory at Cornell University as an Assistant Professor.  Her group published the initial paper in 1984 that identified the MCM2-7 genes as key components in DNA replication.  Dr Yuanliang Zhai, formerly worked in Prof Tye’s group as RAP at HKUST’s LIFS and a Junior Fellow of IAS is now Assistant Professor in School of Biological Sciences at the University of Hong Kong.  The co-authors of this Nature paper also include Dr Wai Hei Lam, Post-doctoral fellow at HKUST’s LIFS and Dr Yongqian Zhao, RAP at HKUST’s LIFS and Junior Fellow of IAS.

About The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) (www.ust.hk) is a world-class research university that focuses on science, technology and business as well as humanities and social science.  HKUST offers an international campus, and a holistic and interdisciplinary pedagogy to nurture well-rounded graduates with global vision, a strong entrepreneurial spirit and innovative thinking.  HKUST attained the highest proportion of internationally excellent research work in the Research Assessment Exercise 2014 of Hong Kong’s University Grants Committee, and is ranked as the world’s best young university in Times Higher Education’s Young University Rankings 2018.  Its graduates were ranked 12th worldwide and top in Greater China in Global Employability University Survey 2017.

For media enquiries, please contact:

Anita Lam
Tel : 2358 6313
Email: anitalam@ust.hk

Johnny Tam
Tel : 2358 8556
Email : johnnytam@ust.hk

STEM Education |
Propelling Hong Kong’s Future Scientists Forward

Staying ahead in an increasingly hyper-competitive global playing field requires sharp observation and analytical thinking, and with that, the ability to think critically and execute an experiment is equally important. To encourage Hong Kong’s budding science student to go beyond their textbooks and demonstrate their mastery of the biology concepts via their problem-solving skills, HKUST is hosting Hong Kong’s first biology competition for senior secondary students: The Hong Kong Joint-School Biology Olympiad (HKJSBO).

Led by HKUST Professor King L. Chow and professors from all eight universities, supported by a dozen secondary school principals and teachers, the HKJSBO sees the competition as a fantastic opportunity for Hong Kong students to apply their powers of observation and logic to reach scientifically correct conclusions. Prof Chow explains: “We sincerely believe that this Joint School Biology Olympiad exercise modelled closely on the International Biology Olympiad format will offer a great platform for our students to study biology in a lively way, and make rounds of tests a stimulating learning experience.” The HKJSBO also hopes the unique and challenging questions will indulge students in exploration and inspire them to pursue science careers.

The competition kicked off last year and attracted close to 500 students from 60 secondary schools; selected through two rounds of tests, four best students had won. What is the prize for the four winners? An unforgettable summer conducting biology research alongside a university professor, some book coupons and trophies. With this superb exercise of investigative science, Hong Kong and its students are all winners.

For details on the Hong Kong Joint-School Biology Olympiad, please click here.

Announcements |
Live Chat on Research Master's & PhD Studies at HKUST

Date: 24 May 2018 (Thursday) 

Time: 4:00 - 5:00pm (GMT+8)

 

Join the Live Chat and talk with us! Our admission officers are happy to share with you more about:  

  • HKUST and its Research Master's & PhD Studies
  • Scholarship Opportunities
  • Application for Admission

 

PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR MORE DETAILS

 

University Development |
HKUST School of Science signs MoU with Ying Ding Education Technology Co., Ltd on collaborative research and development of blended learning initiatives

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) School of Science signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Ying Ding Education Technology Co., Ltd on establishing partnership for strengthening education research collaboration and development of blended learning initiatives.

Ying Ding Education Technology Co., Ltd (Ying Ding) is the first Chinese educational institution integrates education training with product development and network platform, which has played a leading role in the market in relation to national entrance examination and admission of higher education in Mainland China. The Chairman and CEO of the Ying Ding, Mr. Haitao Wang, is our HKUST EMBA alumnus.

A Joint Research Lab will be established with dedicated focus on education data analysis. Both parties are also endeavored to co-develop an innovative learning system in higher education and integrate the system with the traditional one to form a novel blended learning program. The MoU was signed by Prof. Yang Wang, HKUST Dean of Science, and Mr. Haitao Wang, Chairman and CEO of Ying Ding, at a ceremony held on 6 April 2018, witnessed by HKUST Executive Vice-President and Provost (EVPP) Prof. Wei Shyy, Ying Ding Chief Technical Officer Mr. Zhaohui Nie, as well as guests and faculty members from the Department of Mathematics and School of Business and Management (SBM).

 

Research and Innovation |
HKUST Researchers Discover the Genetic Contributions to Alzheimer’s Disease in the Chinese Population Offering Important Clues to the Development of Effective Diagnosis and Treatments

A research team led by scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has identified new Alzheimer’s disease (AD) genetic risk factors in the Chinese population.

 

The team, led by Prof Nancy Ip, Vice-President for Research and Graduate Studies, Director of the State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience and The Morningside Professor of Life Science at HKUST, conducted the study in collaboration with Prof John Hardy and Dr Mok Kin Ying from University College London; Prof Li Yun from the University of North Carolina; Prof Chen Yu from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and the HKUST Shenzhen Research Institute; and Prof Guo Qihao from Huashan Hospital and Fudan University.

 

AD is the most common and best known form of dementia, and one of the leading causes of mortality in the elderly. It is a progressive age-related neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neurological inflammation, which result in cognitive decline and neuronal loss in the brain. Although the prevalence of AD is increasing rapidly with the growing aging population worldwide, the underlying causes of the disease are still unclear, which is a major challenge for effective diagnosis and treatment.

 

Understanding the genetic contributions to AD - by identifying disease-associated genetic risk factors, is essential for deciphering the causes of the disease. Because these genetic risk factors may vary among ethnic groups, genetic studies across different ethnic populations are critical. However, to date, majority of these studies have been conducted in Caucasian populations, and there is relatively little data for other populations. This study is one of the first to investigate the genetic contributions to AD in the Chinese population.

 

By conducting the first whole-genome sequencing (WGS) study in a Chinese AD cohort comprising thousands of participants, the team identified genetic factors associated with AD. The researchers identified variants of a well-studied genetic marker, APOE, as well as two other novel risk genes (GCH1 and KCNJ15) associated with AD. They also discovered that these risk factors are associated with the alteration of immune pathways, specifically changes in immune biomarkers in the brain and blood. These findings provide critical new evidence of the role of the immune system in AD pathology. The ground-breaking work has been published in the prestigious scientific journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). This study serves as Prof Ip’s Inaugural Article for PNAS. The Inaugural Articles comprise a special series of research articles contributed by newly elected members of the National Academy of Sciences (profile of Prof Ip: http://www.pnas.org/content/115/8/1675).

 

“Systematic studies of AD-associated biomarkers can facilitate a deeper understanding of the cause of AD and provide insights for developing improved diagnostics and therapies for AD,” said Prof Ip. “Our next goal is to establish a comprehensive biomarker database for Chinese AD patients, including genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and brain imaging data, by broadening our collaboration with academics and physicians.”

 

This project was generously supported by the University Grants Committee, the Research Grants Council, the Innovation and Technology Commission, National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

 

Prof Nancy Ip is currently the Vice-President for Research and Graduate Studies, The Morningside Professor of Life Science, and the Director of the State Key Laboratory of Molecular Neuroscience at HKUST. Since joining HKUST in 1993, she has served as Dean of Science, Director of the Biotechnology Research Institute, and Head of the Department of Biochemistry. Prof Ip’s outstanding scientific accomplishments have won her numerous awards and honors including the National Natural Science Awards, the L’OREAL-UNESCO ‘For Women in Science’ Award, and the 10 Science Stars of China by Nature. She has been elected to the National People’s Congress, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the US National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the World Academy of Sciences. She is also a founding member of The Academy of Sciences of Hong Kong.

 

Announcements |
HKUST Information Session - MPhil and PhD Studies

Come join us in this Information Session to learn more about:

  • how pursuing an MPhil or PhD program at HKUST would be a good investment for your future
  • how you can make great impacts to the world together with HKUST researchers
  • how the HKUST research programs will put you onto a promising path

 

Rundown:

  • 6:00 - 6:30pm  Light Refreshments
  • 6:30 - 7:10pm  Introduction of MPhil and PhD studies at HKUST with Student Sharing
  • 7:10 - 8:00pm  Breakout Sessions by Individual Schools

 

Office of Postgraduate Studies
The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Email: pgso@ust.hk
Website: http://pg.ust.hk

 

Research and Innovation |
HKUST Discovers New Antibiotics Resistance Mechanism Paving the Way for Design of Antibiotics Against Superbugs

Researchers at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have identified for the first time the culprit behind the causing of broad-spectrum bacterial resistance to peptide antibiotics - widely perceived as the last-line of defense against antibiotic-resistant bacteria, opening a new direction to the design of new drugs in tackling superbugs.

 

The discovery – made by Chair Professor from the Division of Life Science Prof Qian Pei-Yuan and his fellow researchers, came in the best moment as the team has also discovered that this enzyme, which they identified as the cause of broad-spectrum bacteria resistance against peptide antibiotics, was actually found in not just a few, but many different strains of bacteria, sounding an alarm against persistent improper use of antibiotics.

 

Peptide antibiotics - including vancomycin and polymyxin for respective treatment of Staphylococcus Aureus (CA-MRSA) Infection and Escherichia coil infection, are often used as the last resort due to their resilience to multidrug resistant bacteria.  However, a few years ago scientists have started identifying a few types of peptide antibiotics which have developed symptoms of bacterial resistance, although the causes behind remained unknown.  Now, following the analysis of over 6,000 bacteria genomes under repeated validation through gene editing, chemical and enzymatic analyses, Prof Qian’s team eventually identified a family of D-stereospecific resistance peptidases (DRPs) as the source of the problem, and its magnitude extends well beyond a few strains of bacteria.

 

“DRPs are phylogenetically widely distributed in nature, if they are transferred to opportunistic pathogens with human’s increasing misuse and overuse of antibiotics, more and more peptide antibiotics would be rendered useless, leading to delay or even failure in treatment,” said Prof Qian, also David von Hansemann Professor of Science as well as Acting Head of the Department of Ocean Science at HKUST.

 

‘Misuse and overuse of antibiotics of humans will intensify the problem of antibiotic resistance of pathogens, that makes research on peptide antibiotics even more important,” he added. “Deepening our understanding of antibiotic resistance mechanisms to peptide antibiotics does not only serve as a wake-up call, but is also conducive to increasing our collective antibiotic arsenal. The findings of DRPs is just the beginning, we hope it will lead to more research on the use and development of peptide antibiotics.”

 

The findings were recently published in the scientific journal Nature Chemical Biology.

 

Research and Innovation |
HKUST Scientists Find New Way to Produce Chiral Molecules which may Bring Safer and More Affordable Medicine

A research team from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has discovered a more efficient and eco-friendly way to produce a family of chiral molecules, which would potentially bring down the cost of chiral medicine and make them more accessible to all.

Over half of the approved drugs now in use in the world are chiral, which treats a wide range of conditions including cardiovascular, respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases.  Many chiral drugs are top sellers including high-cholesterol medicine Lipitor, and antibiotic Amoxicillin.  But production of chiral drugs are difficult and costly, as the production process is complicated and requires rare and expensive raw materials in general.

Now, a team led by Prof Jianwei Sun, Associate Professor of the Department of Chemistry, discovered useful methods that could result in a more efficient and affordable production of the drugs.

“Chiral molecules contain subunits which are like ‘twin brothers’, they have extremely similar, mirror-like architecture but may exhibit distinct traits in our body,” said Prof Sun. “These ‘twin components’ are particularly hard to separate, and it is costly to get just the useful part out of the two, Chiral allenes represents an example of this type which were made by the very expensive chiral raw materials.”

Prof Sun’s team, however, has discovered that chiral allenes can be produced through organic catalysis using racemic propargylic alcohols, which is cheap and easy to come by, the catalyst is also recyclable and reusable without having to create metal wastes.

“Our method is not only more economical and friendly to the environment, such green catalysis could also have profound impact in health care as drug companies may be able to create and develop chiral drugs in a cheaper and more sustainable way,” said Prof Sun.

The findings were recently published in Nature Communications.

Chiral drugs have a fast growing market. The market size has jumped nearly four folds to around US$800 billion over the past decade and is still growing. Last year, more than two thirds of the newly developing drugs are made of chiral molecules.

About The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology 

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) (www.ust.hk) is a world-class research university that focuses on science, technology and business as well as humanities and social science.  HKUST offers an international campus, and a holistic and interdisciplinary pedagogy to nurture well-rounded graduates with global vision, a strong entrepreneurial spirit and innovative thinking. HKUST attained the highest proportion of internationally excellent research work in the Research Assessment Exercise 2014 of Hong Kong’s University Grants Committee, and is the world’s second in the latest QS’ Top 50 under 50 ranking.  Its graduates were ranked 12th worldwide and top in Greater China in Global Employability University Survey 2017.

For media enquiries, please contact:

Anita Lam
Tel : 2358 6313
Email : anitalam@ust.hk

Alby Wan
Tel : 3469 2512
Email : albywan@ust.hk

Research and Innovation |
HKUST Researchers Identify Irreversible Adverse Effects of Microbeads on Marine Animals’ Growth and Development

A research team at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has demonstrated that the growth and development of two marine invertebrates – the pollution-tolerant slipper limpets and the commercially-harvested bristle worms (a common fish bait which recycles nutrients in the ecosystem) – are prone to suffer irreversible damage under exposure to high concentration of microbeads.

 

The findings – discovered by a team of undergraduate and postgraduate students led by Prof Karen Chan, Assistant Professor from the Division of Life Science at HKUST – have shown for the first time that the detrimental effects of microplastics - tiny plastic pellets found in many health, beauty and household products, are not confined to only upscale, commonly consumed marine invertebrates like abalones and oysters, but also take a toll on tough invasive and nuisance species like the slipper limpets. If these common slipper limpets were exposed to a high concentration of microbeads during their larval stage, they would not resume their original growth rates even after the removal of microbeads from their surroundings.

 

“Our research has shown that a high concentration of microplastics has a long-lasting and irremediable negative impact on the slipper limpets. However, these snails are unfazed by microplastics at an environmental concentration similar to that in Hong Kong waters. If they are more resilient than other native species, the invasive snails could further threaten the local species’ survival and ecological balance,” said Prof Chan. “Despite all the adverse impacts these minute plastic pollutants have on the marine ecosystems, they are still being used in many personal care products around the world – including here in Hong Kong.”

 

Some governments – such as that in Canada[1] and the UK[2], have banned the use of microplastics, but it is still legal in many developed countries including Germany and Japan. In Hong Kong, up to 9.4 billion microbeads are being released to our coastal waters every day[3]. Worldwide, an estimated 15 to 51 trillion microplastic particles have accumulated in the ocean as of 2016[4].

 

“To help save our ocean, we should start with ourselves today. Avoid products with microplastics, think twice before consuming single-use plastics such as straws, bottled drinks as they do degrade into small pieces, and spread the word – do something before it is too late,” Prof Chan pleaded.

 

The team’s other findings on bristle worms have shown that the regeneration rate of their tail is much reduced under exposure to a high concentration of microbeads, and such regenerative ability is crucial for their survival. Smaller beads (8-12 micrometers in diameter) were also found to be more detrimental than larger ones.

 

The team’s findings were recently published in the scientific journals Environmental Pollution and Marine Pollution Bulletin.

 

[1]https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances/other-chemical-substances-interest/microbeads.html

[2]https://www.gov.uk/government/news/world-leading-microbeads-ban-takes-effect

[3]https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X16303460

[4]https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201617/cmselect/cmenvaud/179/179.pdf

Research and Innovation |
HKUST Scientists Reveal How Human Brains Keep Balance

An interdisciplinary team of scientists from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has discovered the mechanism of how human brains turn on and off neuronal activities, providing an important foundation to understand a wide range of neurologic conditions such as epilepsy, Parkinson's disease and ataxia-telangiectasia diseases.

“As with all things in life, healthy brain function depends on a balance of neuronal activities. We think of our brains as active - moving a leg and saying a word are all "active" events, but it is just as important that our brains be able to stop these actions,” said Cheng Aifang, a postgraduate student from the Division of Life Science who made the discovery under the guidance of the division’s head and Chair Professor Karl Herrup. “Yet it was not clear how our brains actually perform this go/stop function until now.”

The team discovered that the brain balances excitation and inhibition through regulating ATM and ATR – large kinase enzymes, levels.  In pathological conditions, when ATM levels drop for example, ATR levels increase, vice versa.  In addition, the team also discovered that ATM only regulates excitatory synaptic vesicles while ATR is responsible for only the inhibitory ones.  This is achieved by controlling the movement of these tiny synaptic vesicles in the neuronal synapse – the gap between two neurons that regulates information flow in the brain.

“The discoveries are in the realm of basic research, but they have important implications for human disease” said Prof Karl Herrup, also director of the Super-Resolution Imaging Center (SRIC). “Epilepsy, for example, is a condition where one of the problems is that inhibition fails. As our findings would predict, humans with too little ATR have a problem with epilepsy, while people with ATM deficiency by contrast are ataxic - a reduced ability to make finely controlled movements and keep the proper E/I ratio. This means that there is a yin-yang relationship between ATM and ATR.  And this is only the beginning. We believe that our work has potential relevance to a much broader range of neurologic conditions.”

The findings were published in the Journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences earlier this month.

Utilizing super-resolution microscopy offered by at HKUST, the researchers were able to view the cellular location of the two kinases at ultra-high magnification.  The custom designed super-resolution microscope with active stage locking provided the stability needed to obtain high-resolution images.

“One of the challenges we faced was that even at high magnification, all vesicles look pretty much alike,” said Prof Du Shengwang, physics professor and Associate Director of SRIC.  “To provide differentiation, we developed a three-color version of our super-resolution system, which allowed the team to prove that ATM and ATR were never found on the same VAMP2-containing synaptic vesicle.”

About The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology 

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) (www.ust.hk) is a world-class research university that focuses on science, technology and business as well as humanities and social science.  HKUST offers an international campus, and a holistic and interdisciplinary pedagogy to nurture well-rounded graduates with global vision, a strong entrepreneurial spirit and innovative thinking. HKUST attained the highest proportion of internationally excellent research work in the Research Assessment Exercise 2014 of Hong Kong’s University Grants Committee, and is the world’s second in the latest QS’ Top 50 under 50 ranking.  Its graduates were ranked 12th worldwide and top in Greater China in Global Employability University Survey 2017.

For media enquiries, please contact:

Anita Lam
Tel : 2358 6313
Email : anitalam@ust.hk

Etta Lai
Tel : 2358 6317
Email : ettalai@ust.hk

Announcements |
Live Chat on Research Master's & PhD Studies at HKUST

Date: 24 January 2018 (Wednesday) 

Time: 4:00 - 5:00pm (GMT+8)

 

Join the Live Chat and talk with us! Our admission officers are happy to share with you more about:  

  • HKUST and its Research Master's & PhD Studies
  • Scholarship Opportunities
  • Application for Admission

 

PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR MORE DETAILS